Installing and Using the Citrix XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK

In this post, we will go over the installation steps of the Citrix XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK, explorer what is added to the XenApp 6.5 server during installation, and compile one of the samples given in the SDK.

Now that we have setting up an Android emulator out of the way, let’s take a look at installing the Citrix XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK and what the install does to a XenApp 6.5 server.

There are 2 parts that you need in order to develop applications that utilize mobile capabilities on a XenApp 6.5 server:

  1. The XenApp 6.5 Mobility Pack – this is the part that goes on the XenApp 6.5 server.
  2. The Citrix XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK – this is the part you use to develop mobile applications.

 

XenApp 6.5 Mobility Pack

When you install the Mobility Pack, 2 new services are added to your XenApp server:

  1. Citrix Location and Sensor Virtual Channel Service – this service enables a server side application to leverage Location and Sensor capabilities.
  2. Citrix Mobile Receiver Virtual Channel Service – this service enables a server side application to use mobile device capabilities.

These 2 virtual channels are kept separate for security reasons.  Maybe you want to have mobile device capabilities available, but you cannot enable GPS features due to security compliance.  Location services are disabled on the Citrix Receiver by default. The way to enable the location capabilities is via Citrix policies.  In order to use these policies, you will need to install the Citrix Group Policy Client-Side Extensions.  These extensions are part of the XenApp Mobility Pack .zip file.

This policy is located under ICA\Client Sensors\Location. Notice that by default, location is disabled.

 

Citrix XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK

So, the requirements for the Citrix XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK state that you need Windows 7 64 bit (and the MSI is even named XenApp65MobileApplicationSdk64), but it installs to ..\Program Files (x86)\Citrix\MobilitySDK\.  I tried installing the SDK on a Windows 7 32 bit system as well and it worked, so I’m not sure if something absolutely will not work on 32 bit.

I’m using Visual Studio for the examples.  It appears that Visual Studio Express (free) will work as well, but I haven’t tested that myself.

Anyway, the documentation that comes with the SDK is pretty comprehensive so I’m not going to rehash it here.  Since I will be showing you some of the examples using .Net, I do want to point out that you will need to run one of the following commands on your development machine in order for things to work:

Regsvr32 cmpcom.dll
Regsvr32 cmpcom64.dll

Notice that there is a 32 bit or a 64 bit DLL register. So again, not sure why Windows 7 64bit is a requirement for development. Anyway, make sure you run the appropriate command above as administrator, otherwise you may receive an error stating “The module was loaded but the call to DllRegisterServer failed with error code 0x80070005” (which is a permissions error).

Compiling Examples

The final part of this article will focus on compiling and using the examples that come with the SDK.  The one I’m going to point out here is the picker example.  This example uses the native device’s UI to display a list of options.  The example is actually a console application that has no graphics, so it is actually using the local device’s display mechanisms rather than trying to do some trickery on the XenApp server side.  So, here we go…

  1. Browse to \Program Files (x86)\Citrix\MobilitySDK\samples\native\showpicker
  2. Double click on showpicker.sln to open the solution in Visual Studio
  3. Build the solution by pressing F6
  4. This will create an executable in \Program Files (x86)\Citrix\MobilitySDK\samples\native\Win32\Debug\showpicker.exe
  5. Copy this showpicker.exe to your XenApp 6.5 server (I copied mine to \Program Files (x86)\Mobility\picker\showpicker.exe)
  6. Publish the application via Citrix AppCenter
  7. Launch the published application using an Android device (or emulator) with the latest Citrix Receiver installed.

NOTE: You may receive an error message that states “The program can’t start because MSVCR100D.dll is missing from your computer…”  Here’s why – the solution was built in debug mode.  Thus, debug DLL’s (notice the “D” in the DLL name) need to be on the XenApp 6.5 server.  Here is what you can do:

Copy:

  • From: \Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\redist\Debug_NonRedist\x86\Microsoft.VC100.DebugCRT\msvcr100d.dll on your development machine
  • To: \Windows\SysWOW64\msvcr100d.dll on your XenApp 6.5 server
You could technically build the solution in Release mode instead of Debug mode and be okay, but to perform remote debugging, you will want to have the debug DLL on your remote machine.  Speaking of debugging, here are 2 great write-ups on how to debug the mobile applications:

 

The Result

Here is what the end result looks like.

Once you pick one of the colors, the console application will give you feedback on the chosen item.  When the appropriate receiver is available for iOS, then the native iOS selector would be shown with no code changes on the developer’s part.  That is pretty cool!

In the next article on this topic, I will show you how to use mobile device orientation to change what is displayed to an end user.  The example will include data and graphics.  Stay tuned…

Setting up an Android Emulator for use with Citrix XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK

One of the coolest SDKs I’ve seen come out in quite a while is the Citrix XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK. As of this writing, only the Android version of the Citrix Receiver is supported so I will show you how to set up an Android emulator with the Citrix Receiver for testing purposes.

One of the coolest SDKs I’ve seen come out in quite a while is the Citrix XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK. Citrix defines the XenApp 6.5 Mobile Application SDK as “… a rich tool kit for developers to write touch-friendly, mobilized applications that are hosted on Citrix XenApp and delivered to any device with Citrix Receiver. These mobilized applications are able to leverage a wide set of mobile device functionality including GPS, sensors, cameras, and device buttons in the same way that locally running, native applications do.”

As of this writing, only the Android version of the Citrix Receiver is supported (iOS is on the way).  Since I do not own any Android devices and I was anxious to get started, I had to set up an emulator and install the Citrix Receiver to get going with the SDK.  Here is how I did it.

 

Install the Android SDK

Go to the Android SDK download page (http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html) and pick the correct installer for your platform. I’m using Windows, so I chose the .exe installer file.  After you run this .exe, you still do not have the emulator.  The reason for this is the Android SDK archive initially contains only the basic SDK tools. It does not contain an Android platform or any third-party libraries. You must install the Platform-tools and at least one version of the Android platform using the SDK Manager.

Android SDK Manager

I installed the Android SDK Platform-tools and all options for Android 4.0.3.

After the install completes, be sure to add %ProgramFiles%\Android\android-sdk\platform-tools to your PATH environment variable.  This will be handy later for installing the Citrix Receiver.

 

Create an Android Virtual Device

After the installs complete, you can launch Android Virtual Device Manager (AVD Manager). This can be found in the Windows start menu under Android SDK Tools \ AVD Manager. AVD Manager is used to create various virtual devices running the Android OS.

Android Virtual Device for XenApp 6.5 Mobile Appliction SDK
As you can see, I created an Android 4.0.3 device with 100 MiB of local storage. The more storage you add to your AVD, the longer it will take to boot. Since this AVD is only being used for XenApp 6.5 testing, I only allocated 100 MiB. The first boot of your AVD will take a little longer than subsequent boots.

 

Download the Citrix Receiver for Android

Now that we have a functioning Android emulator, we need to get the Citrix Receiver installed. The first thing we need to do is download the .apk (Android Package) file. Normally, I would just go to http://www.citrix.com/receiver and choose “Android”. But, as of this writing, when you do that, you are redirected to the Android Marketplace. Unfortunately, Android Marketplace does not work on the Android Emulator. So, here is what you can do instead:
Go to http://www.citrix.com/downloads and choose “Receiver for Android” from the drop down list. From there, you can select the Android client and download the .apk.

 

Install the Citrix Receiver for Android

Ok, so now we have a functioning Android emulator and the Citrix Receiver downloaded. The final step is to install the Citrix Receiver onto the emulator. Here’s how:

  1. Copy the .apk file to %ProgramFiles%\Android\android-sdk\tools
  2. Open a command prompt and change the directory to %ProgramFiles%\Android\android-sdk\tools
  3. With the AVD you created running, execute the following command:
adb install <name of Citrix Receiver>.apk

Citrix Receiver for Android

 

You now have a fully functional Citrix Receiver running on an Android emulator.  My next post shows you how to set up a development environment to utilize the Mobile Application SDK and compile some of the examples.

 

Citrix XenApp 6 PowerShell SDK: Getting a List of Applications with C#

This post will show you how to use the Citrix XenApp 6 PowerShell SDK to obtain a list of applications from your XenApp 6 farm. We’ll look at how to do this with using the PowerShell Runspace and how to do this using the Citrix XenApp 6 wrapper assembly.

This post will show you how to use the Citrix XenApp 6 PowerShell SDK to obtain a list of applications from your XenApp 6 farm. We’ll look at how to do this with using the PowerShell Runspace and how to do this using the Citrix XenApp 6 wrapper assembly. The examples used in this post will be using an ASP.NET website, but the code can be reused in a Windows application, Console application, web service, etc.

Note Note: Be sure to read the getting started post for information about adding the correct references to your project.

Using the PowerShell Runspace

I added a Web Form to my project named RunSpaceFactory.aspx. Here is what it looks like:

using System.Management.Automation;
using System.Management.Automation.Runspaces;

namespace WebApplication1
{
    public partial class RunSpaceFactory : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Runspace rs = RunspaceFactory.CreateRunspace();
            rs.Open();

            PowerShell ps = PowerShell.Create();
            ps.Runspace = rs;

            PSSnapInException ex;
            rs.RunspaceConfiguration.AddPSSnapIn("Citrix.XenApp.Commands", out ex);

            ps.AddCommand("Get-XAApplication");

            // You can add a search string like this:
            // ps.AddCommand("Get-XAApplication").AddParameter("BrowserName", "n*");

            foreach (PSObject app in ps.Invoke())
            {
                Response.Write(app.Properties["DisplayName"].Value);
                Response.Write("");
            }

            rs.Close();
        }
    }
}

Lines 10 – 14 are standard PowerShell things you would do to work with PowerShell in any C# application.

Line 17 adds the Citrix PowerShell SnapIn to the Runspace so we can execute the Citrix commands.

Lines 19 – 28 lists all the applications in the XenApp 6 farm.

Note line 21 & 22. If line 22 was uncommented, this excerpt would list all the applications that start with the letter ‘n’ by adding a parameter to the Get-XAApplication command. You can use any matching pattern here like ‘%o*’ which would get all applications whose second letter is ‘o’.

Using the Citrix XenApp 6 Wrapper Assembly

When using the Citrix XenApp 6 wrapper assembly, you first need to add references to the appropriate DLLs to your project. The DLLs can be found in %ProgramFiles%\Citrix\XenApp Server SDK\bin

AddXenApp6Reference

After adding the references, here is the code to accomplish the same task from above:

using System.Management.Automation;
using System.Management.Automation.Runspaces;

using Citrix.Management.Automation;
using Citrix.XenApp.Sdk;
using Citrix.XenApp.Commands;

namespace WebApplication1
{
    public partial class ListApplications : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            GetXAApplicationByName apps = new GetXAApplicationByName();
            apps.BrowserName = new string[] {"*"};

            foreach (PSObject _app in CitrixRunspaceFactory.DefaultRunspace.ExecuteCommand(apps))
            {
                XAApplication app = (XAApplication)_app.BaseObject;

                Response.Write(app.BrowserName);
                Response.Write("");
            }
        }
    }
}

As you can see, there is quite a bit less code here.

Line 14 sets up all your Runspace stuff and adds the appropriate command.

Line 15 adds a parameter to the command. This is an interesting line because the BrowserName property expects an array of strings. I’m just passing one string here, but you could pass several to match. For example, string[] {“n*”, “%o*”} would find all apps that either started with the letter ‘n’ or the second letter was ‘o’.

We loop through the results in lines 18 – 24. Note that I cast the PSObject (generic PowerShell object) to a XAApplication object. This helps with the type safety and IntelliSense. To be fair, you can do the exact same thing in the PowerShell Runspace example above if you wanted.

The Results

Here is what the Citrix Delivery Services Console looks like concerning published applications:

Citrix Delivery Services Console Applications

Here is the output from both examples:

WebAppPS

What’s Next?

The next examples will show you how to publish and application as well as how to manage sessions. You can also get a jump start by downloading the example code below: